Basics of Horticulture by Sharon Pastor Simson, Martha C. Straus

By Sharon Pastor Simson, Martha C. Straus

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On the one hand, nutrients have their individual specific functions as described above. On the other hand, there are also some common functions as well as interactions. These can be positive or negative. Where a nutrient interaction is synergistic, their combined impact on plant production is greater than the sum of their individual effects where used singly. In an antagonistic interaction, their combined impact on plant production or concentration in tissues is lower than the sum of their individual effects: synergistic interaction: effect of nutrient A on yield = 100, effect of nutrient B on yield = 50, effect of combined use of A and B on yield = greater than 150; antagonistic interaction: effect of nutrient A on yield = 100, effect of nutrient B on yield = 50, effect of combined use of A and B on yield = lower than 150; = 150.

Another fact in favour of autumnal planting is the production of roots in winter. The best way of performing transplantation depends greatly on the size of the trees, the soil in which they grow, and the mechanical appliances made use of in lifting and transporting them. The smaller the tree the more successfully can it be removed. The more argillaceous and the less siliceous the soil the more readily can balls of earth be retained about the roots. All planters lay great stress on the preservation of the fibrils; the point principally disputed is to what extent they can with safety be allowed to be cut off in transplantation.

Purpureus, and others again intermediate between these. We may hence infer that C. purpureus was grafted or budded on the common laburnum, and that the intermediate forms are the result of grafthybridisation. Numerous similar facts have been recorded. Among gardeners the general opinion is against the possibility of graft-hybridisation. The wonder, however, seems to be that it does not occur more frequently, seeing that fluids must pass from stock to scion, and matter elaborated in the leaves of the scion must certainly to some extent enter the stock.

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